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Ontario Connecting More People To Care At Home

By Carleton MPP Goldie Ghamari

As part of Your Health: A Plan for Connected and Convenient Care, Ontario is connecting people to convenient care at home and in their community so more Ontarians can choose to stay in their homes for longer as they age or are able to receive care closer to home. Delivering convenient care at home provides a better experience for people and frees up more space in hospitals, long-term care homes and doctors’ offices.

Last year, the government invested $1 billion to expand the delivery of home and community care services to help more people connect to the care they need in the comfort of their own home. From more caregiver supports and respite services, bereavement and behavioural programs to assisted living services for people with brain injuries, work is underway to provide faster and more convenient access to the care they need.

The province is also working with Ontario Health Teams and home and community care providers to create new and innovative programs for people wanting to connect to care at home, including more virtual care options and connecting home care services with other care providers such as a family doctor to ensure personal medical records follow people as they move between care providers. These investments will help nearly 700,000 families who rely on home care annually to connect to care more conveniently.

With the help of paramedics, those living with chronic health conditions can now live at home more independently and avoid regular visits to the hospital waiting room. Ontario’s expanded community paramedicine program is already in place in 55 communities and has connected more than 30,000 people to 24/7 non-emergency support at home. The initiative allows paramedics to use their training and expertise to provide home visits for a range of services, including making sure medication is taken as prescribed, educating people on how to properly manage their chronic conditions and providing assessments and referrals to local community care services, such as home care.

Ontario is also expanding palliative care services by adding 23 new hospice beds to the 500 beds already available across the province to connect Ontarians with comfortable and dignified end-of-life care near their communities and loved ones. Ensuring Ontarians have a choice about where they spend their final days is an important part of ensuring Ontarians can connect to the care they need throughout their entire life.

With Your Health: A Plan for Connected and Convenient Care, the province is making it easier for people and their families to connect to the care they need, whether that’s by expanding access to services in their home or community or giving them the choice to book or take an appointment virtually, to ensure hospital and long-term beds are available when it is needed most.

Quick Facts

  • Ontario Health Teams will help guide the expansion and modernization of home and community care.
  • Home and community care services support people of all ages who require care in their home, at school or in the community. Seniors and those experiencing complex medical conditions can often stay in their homes if they have some support.
  • The Ontario Caregiver Organization supports caregivers across Ontario with a suite of programs and resources including the 24/7 Ontario Caregiver Helpline 1-833-416-2273 (CARE), counselling and peer support groups, webinars, tip sheets and checklists available at www.ontariocaregiver.ca.

Office Notice:

My office is open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 4 pm. If you require assistance on any matter, please contact me at any time. My staff and I will be happy to assist. Even if it’s not a provincial issue, I’ll make sure to connect you with the proper office.

– Goldie

Your voice at Queen’s Park

Featured Image: Marjorie Toner Haan, MPP Goldie Ghamari and Rideau-Jock Councillor David Brown were on hand to help out and meet and greet people at the Manotick Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast during Shiverfest.

Gary Coulombe photo